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September 23, 2010 • Football

Larry Kehres, University of Mount Union: Roll Pass Double Cross

(Union College) in Alliance, Ohio, is considered a mastermind when it comes to scoring touchdowns in the red zone. He shared one of his favorite red-zone passing plays, which is called Roll Pass Double Cross.

Larry KehresFollow the Raiders on Twitter!DIAGRAM 1: Roll Pass Double Cross. On the snap, the weak-side wide receiver (X) runs a 10- to 12-yard intermediate crossing pattern. The strong-side wide receiver (Z) runs a 15-yard deep crossing pattern. He then sits in an open window. The slot receiver (Y) runs a delay, flat route at five yards depth. Y stings the outside linebacker if pressure is coming from Roll Pass Double Crossthe edge.

Depending on the defense, H, who starts in the backfield, runs through the B-gap to a flat aiming point at six yards on the sideline if H is moving to the front-side of the play (as in the diagram). If H is going to the backside, he takes a jab-step fake, checks the backside A-, B- and C-gap for the blitz. If there is no blitz, then H holds the outside C-gap.

The other back, T, goes to the backside if H goes to the front side, so T’s backside movement includes a jab-step fake, checking the backside A-, B- and C-gaps for the blitz, then holding the outside C-gap if there is no blitz. If T is moving to the front side, he runs through the B-gap to the flat aiming at a point four yards out on the sideline.

The quarterback’s drop timing is to play-action pass, reverse pivot fake 54-55, set up in the B-gap at six yards and underneath the block of the pulling guard.

The hot read is to the running back who is in the flat. The movement key is: curl-flat defender front side. The progression is: front-side flat to front-side middle cross to backside deep cross.



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